poetry, TTOT

Ten Things of Thankful – February 26 2021

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It’s TTOT time and let’s get to it!

  1. What do you mean? February is over ALREADY? I mean we still have two more days, but whew! BUT it was a very productive month, despite challenges and let’s just jump to the results, they are why we are here, right? So my first thankful is that I have had the poem, “To Write” published.
  2. People are so supportive! My fellow poets are coming forward to help put together Coffee Table Talk for April. More about that in a future post, but suffice it to say that all spaces are filled and filled up fast!
  3. Daughter has been helping a friend with some projects and I am grateful that daughter is able to help and that she has such a nice friend.
  4. Daughter and friend brought us supper so I did not have to cook! I am so happy when that happens.
  5. Blessings that just come for no reason at all. You know, the ones you didn’t ask for but surely needed.
  6. A book of which I edited is being offered for Free on Kindle today and tomorrow. Don’t you need a book of love poems? I am happy to be a part of this book Love’s Anticipation.
  7. With zoom and other meeting apps we are able to reach so many people.
  8. Collaborations are fun and I am working on one.
  9. Saving one of the bests for last is this weather has brought on the breath of spring!
  10. What’s your thankful? Let’s hear it in the comments or how about a post? Esther is nosy to know, too!
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Short Fiction, short story, six sentence story, writing

The Strength of Hope and Faith

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This is my Six Sentence Story, a continuation about Clarabelle and Shandy, which has been a running story for a few weeks. I have not decided if this is the end, but I will see what happens as the week goes by. Perhaps the other story members will call out to me and ask me to tell more about them. Thanks to Denise for putting up with my attempt at serializing this story and for being less than concise. Yes, I push those six sentences to the limit, guilty as charged. So, are you thinking you want to join Denise’s Six Sentence Story blog hop? Well, hop to it by going to this LINK

*****

The Strength of Hope and Faith

Shandy continued with her story about he husband, away, serving in Vietnam, “Clair, I was so religious about writing to Marcus and it would be spurts where I didn’t hear from him, before I would be several letters in one day, so it was just the way it was where he was serving, he was on the front lines and I couldn’t really expect instant letters every day,” Shandy paused, starting to tear up, Clarabelle reached over and patted her hand, and poured another cup of tea for Shandy, “and then the letters slowed down, real slow, sometimes for weeks, and I got really worried that there was something wrong, and then I got a letter from him that there was a bad storm and it was more than difficult to get letters out, so he was okay and, well, I was surely relieved, a lot of the letters he had ready to mail, ended up in a mess of mud and they pretty much had to plow through all the muck to get to a clear path, so those were long gone.”

“Oh, my dear girl, that must have been quite the ordeal for you, as I remember how it was for my family, it sure could be hard to get those letters back and forth, I suppose wars have a way about making it hard, too bad there was no easy way to make a phone call.”

“That’s just the thing, Clair, I did get a phone call from Marcus, he sounded so distraught, and said that he had to take some time to sort things out, and in the meantime, he was put on medic assistance duty, so he could clear his head, although, I will tell you that in a war zone, it’s hard to clear your head in a medical camp, so it was hard for him, but he took to the work, and he did so well with it that they kept him there for the duration, so, you see, that worked out; and when he came back home he decided to pursue medicine and went to school for emergency medical technician training, not really wanting to be a doctor, but an emergency worker, since he found out that was where he did his best work,” pausing to catch her breath, Shandy sipped her tea before continuing, “while Marcus studied, I worked as a waitress, because I was good at it and was not ready to consider going to school or start a family, not until he was solid with his job, so I was able to bring in a lot of tips, because that’s where waitresses make their real money, and we managed well, even if it was tight, but we had our love and it all worked out.”

“That’s an adventure you have had with learning to be patient and survive what must have been one of the most difficult times of your life and look how you came through with helping your husband do well and pursue his goals, for the best of both of you.”

“Thank you, Clair, it was nice, like a real-life honeymoon in a way as we just worked well together, like a team, so after he graduated and was working full-time, I was able to think about my own goals, and that was when I got pregnant, not really planned, but not unwanted either, so there I was pregnant and that’s when things changed, and not for the better, mind you, and I finally got it out of him about his experiences in Vietnam and things he saw, and how he was afraid he would not be a good father; of which I assured him that such a kind soul could be nothing less than a great dad; but he started pulling back, became less affectionate and the nightmares he had were more frequent, they were always about something to do with the war, and I was so afraid for him, knowing it must have been painful to see things and not forget, but I was always there for him, no matter what, and we gradually worked on things with a counselor, I mean, he was invested, for sure, and the counselor helped us get past these things, and when we had our little boy, he was the best father to him, always careful with handling him, and affectionate, like all his worries went away,” pausing for a tissue, the wells of pain flooded and Shandy shook, trembling and collapsed in Clair’s arms, eventually, with the comfort of Clair, Shandy was able to go on, “Marcus was the best father to our son, Gerald, and loved him until his last days, as, Marcus had a heart attack while he was working on a run and he did not make it, and it turned out he may have had a heart condition, but at that point, we just knew that he was gone and Gerald and I carried on, as best as we could, Gerald was 19 when his father passed away and he is doing well with college, but when he decided to go away to school, I decided I needed to get away from all the memories and moved to Iowa, so while the war did not ruin us, life had another plan, and I rely on the presence of his spirit to keep Marcus alive, but, to tell you the honest truth, I just could not longer live in a town where we made many happy memories, so just like my dad live after he lost mom, I moved.”

“Sweetheart, life surely does turn things around unexpectedly, but it looks like you are a get on up and get to it kind of person, look at how you have done with your life, you serve others, you are compassionate, you have a strength which is calm, yet mighty, and I certainly do understand the desire to move to new memories, as I had to do similar when I lost Herbie, I could no longer live in the house we made into a home, so I made a move to an apartment, and now, my dear Shandy, I have a beautiful, inside and out, friend, and we are not that much different, just in age, but not much different in clarity, we will plow through life and find that at the end of the road, is a heap of  heap of muck, but that muck is what we have to go through to find the treasures.”

Short Fiction, short story, six sentence story

We Got This

“Great and marvelous are thy works, o Lord of hosts, almighty God…,” were the words flowing from Clarabelle as she sat beside Herbie’s hospital bed, he smiled and held her hand, listening to her angelic voice, much like the clink of the crystals hanging from the doorway, gentle, yet powerful.

“He’s going to be just fine, ma’am, he just had a little stress, but his heart checked out fine,” the doctor patted Herbie on the shoulder, “now, you do need to stop that smoking, it’s only fair of me to mention, as it is slowing you down,” Herbie nodded and looked over at Clarabelle and winked.

The doctor left the room, Clarabelle looked in her husband’s eyes and held his hand, “you know, honey, it’s important to listen to what the doctor said, I, uh,” tears rolled down her cheeks and Herbie’s eyes watered.

Squeezing his wife’s hand, Herbie spoke, through choked back tears, “Clair, we are going to do this together, I know what I need to do and as hard as it is gonna be, it’s gotta be done,” to which Clarabelle nodded and arose from her seat.

“Many are called for great things, love, and you were called to be with me and while I am not a great thing, I need to tell you, I need you in my life, Herbie, and there’s no two ways about it, I marvel at God’s gift to us, and sure don’t want to take it for granted.”

Often, Herbie thought his wife should start preaching, because her words would stick with him better than any person at the pulpit, reaching for her hand, he gave it a squeeze, “honey, we have this covered, no matter what, and that is that, you are the greatest thing to ever happen to me.”

Sing of His Mighty Love

Come join us at the blog hop for Six Sentence Story

poetry

Reclaiming

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Reclaiming

Twisting jeweled cuffs over knuckles,

silky knot loosely skimming cleavage.

Gathering, clasping silver sparkled strands,

gracefully dabbing her beaded forehead.

Scrutinizing mirrored reflections,

slipping into glistening peds, then rising.

Grasping cool marble, steadying her walker.

Gliding slowly, halting, gasping.

Long estranged, eyes locked,

sparks of youth flaming as shadows pass.

*****

This is a combined prompt response:

Six Sentence Story completed in the form of a poem, using the prompt word “twist.”

Living Poetry Monday prompt “write an extraneous poem.”

poetry, short story

Meet Me in the Middle

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“You have me bending over backwards every day and I am sick of it!” Meghan stomped out of her and her husband’s house. They had another daily spat over one more thing and one more thing was enough to break Meghan’s ever patient mind.

“It’s unacceptable to be constantly running around all day long and not get anything done; look at this house, it is a pigsty,” exclaimed Clarence right before Meghan ran out on him.

Looking at the house, there were the morning’s dishes piled in the sink and yesterday’s laundry in the basket to be folded, while Clarence sat at his computer and played games, waiting for Meghan to wait on him, while he also ignored the children; and that’s when things got loud; Clarence opened his mouth and asked when would lunch be served. This was right after Meghan just got home from picking up their children at school, along with running errands for groceries, gas, getting his list of “necessities” and not grabbing a latte.

As Meghan drove away, she heard this song and made one of her own.

Just a little bending

Takes so little effort

Putting down that plaything

Would be more acceptable

Over unacceptable responses

Killing chances at harmony

…..

There you have it! This is my Six Sentence Story – Double Feature 😉 A little prose, a little poetry and away we go! Want to join us? Go to Girlie on the Edge and have a shot at at.

And bonus points for checking out Living Poetry for the other prompt for this week. Win:Win