non-fiction, poetry, TTOT, writing

Ten Things of Thankful – July 3 2020

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Happy TTOT and Fourth of July celebration week! May you have at least a virtual celebration with fireworks and all! Only, this year, you will need a mask and social distancing. Looks like some with do this with parking and watching and others will do it virtually. Be safe and mindful and it should go well.

  1. Opportunities to expand my reach. It’s a secret, but suffice it to say I have been given an opportunity to delve into something which I am familiar, but at another level of responsibility. It is exciting.
  2. Editing. I am editing a horror/murder mystery and it’s crawling my skin, but it is also very good in that it is crawling my skin and piquing my curiosity. Except, I know what happens and woooo weeee! That’s all I gotta say about that.
  3. Did you know it is World Watercolor Month? I found out about it in the Poet’s Connection meetup last Saturday. Here’s the LINK for info. I may get out my paints and give it a shot. Daily prompts are not likely to be my thing, but I can work on a project I have put off.
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4. Poet’s Connection Meetup has been going well. We met last Saturday and it always makes me smile to get together with poets. We talked about Sonnets and shared some we wrote or found.

5. Daughter is back to volunteering. There are mom rules and thrift store rules she has to follow. She does love to do the work and right now her own job is slow. I am grateful she has this productive way to spend her time.

6. Tax season will be over July 15. With the exception of extension, that is. So, there is light at the end of the calculator.

7. Poetry Dive – I have participated in another Poetry Dive for the month of June. It is like a family reunion with this group as many of us are returning poets. Fortunately, I stay connected through other groups members are a part of and have become social media friends so we can stay connected. It is always sad to see it end. That means good things happened.

8. The IRS…huh? Yes, you heard me right! I am grateful that for the first time in a good while I was able to reach the IRS and talk to a real person about a matter. I feel answered and listened to and all is well.

9. Books. I am grateful to be able to read. It’s a blessing and I have several on a pile to dig into.

10. You! How are you doing? Won’t you join us with virtual S’Mores? Sit by the campfire and swap some yarns…

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non-fiction, writing

Writing Sprints

Photo by Claus Grünstäudl on Unsplash

In the past couple of weeks-via Meetup-I have participated in Writing Sprints. It’s a pretty cool way to get things done, especially when you get sidetracked, like I do. It is not a new concept for me, but I had not participated in one in ages. A couple of writers and I were doing them consistently, but life changes and all, we departed. It’s all good, though. Recently, at a TAF Talks presentation by Donna Gephart, I learned about how she writes 25 minutes and then takes short breaks, then back to writing. So, I found the Sprints listed on Meetup and gave it a shot. They operate pretty much like that, too. And this morning, I searched on YouTube and there are live sprints. You can note in chat if you want to say something on there. I like the Zoom or Google meetings better so you can have more interaction. But, the YouTube option can be helpful, too. There’s one this month for NANOWRIMO for the summer camp version.So, thought I would share about these resources. It helped me and may be helpful to you.

non-fiction, poetry

Little Fellow

Little fellow found comfort with his thumb, if you tried to stop him, he would go “unh, unh, unh.”

Then one day we tried the sipping cup, he gave up his thumb, he was growing up.

He learned to walk when we would hold his hands; Daddy made him a board so he could stand.

Wherever he was he’d be by our side; And oh, how he loved to in his wagon ride.

Sipping water as we climbed the sky, ears a popping but he did not cry.

Little fellow always for the ride, no matter what he would rather laugh than cry.

Photo by Gary Sandoz on Unsplash

Six Sentence Story Link is Here

non-fiction

Raymond Burr – Actor Extraordinaire

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Raymond Burr was an excellent, award-winning actor, who I first remember as playing Perry Mason and eventually he played a detective by the name of Robert T. Ironside, who battled crime from his wheelchair in a van. The story was that he was in a wheelchair because he was paralyzed from an assassination attempt, but I digress.

While much of my exposure to Burr was via the television, he was a well-known actor in the movie industry. Starting out in a repertory theatre group from Toronto, in 1934, he moved on to New York where he gained recognition in Broadway, continuing in at least 50 feature films; With a voice for radio, he worked in broadcasting, as well.

 He played in a variety of films from horror to romance to crime, and more.  It was television of which he performed from around 1957 to 1993, leaving this world that same year.

This is my Six-Sentence Story for this week, writing to the Prompt word of “Iron”

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While there is so much more to learn about Raymond Burr, I invite you to research further into his life. He is truly a fascinating person.

non-fiction

Aching of the Soul

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Such a passion for life, he had heartfelt goals; raising his daughter to become a confident woman; he lived his life to become the best man for his family; he saw the worth of souls and was a shining light to those who knew him.

Now, he is gone.

Just like that; He has been preparing his entire life for his homegoing; but it was not to be his time, just yet. He had two daughters and a son to live out his life for, to witness their walks of life, yet he is gone.

A man’s last words became his call to live and just like that he was denied. I envision his mother heard him and took him in her arms; and while his life on earth is over, let not his soul be wasted, let not his purpose be forgotten, and may we only hope to walk down the aisles of life with the passion of this man, this man who wanted to breathe.

George Perry Floyd Obituary on Find A Grave. You can leave a virtual flower and note.

Six Sentence Story Word Prompt: Passion