TTOT

Ten Things of Thankful – May 8 2020

gulf fritillary butterfly perching on flower
Photo by Jonathan Borba on Pexels.com

Good Morning and Happy Friday! For many of the folks, this means Phase 1 or 2 of the pandemic rules. We are in Phase 1 as of 5 p.m. today. #1 I am grateful for masks and hand sanitizer and to be able to drive. #2 I am grateful for Six Sentence Story of which I can be slack. Here is this weeks contribution from me Gulf fritillary facts The picture on this blog bears the same butterfly. I love butterflies!! #3 I am grateful that daughter follows social distancing and wears a mask and gloves at her job. Customers are now coming in, but they are limited and I am grateful for this, as well. It’s a craft and sewing store, so there are likely a lot of in home folks making things. #4 I am grateful that soon I will get a box of new art supplies and for those who love to create I know that you know what that means.

#5 That I have been blessed with a wonderful mother and that even though she is no longer with us I still consider her a very essential part of my life.

15966079_10158052915000203_8401078897215862861_n That’s me on the sofa leaning into mom.

#6. Auto insurance refund for the pandemic. Check your insurance company if interested in seeing if you qualify.
#7 New tires – while it was not really what we wanted to do right now, it is time to get new tires. We were able to get the car to the place before a flat. I am grateful for that, too because who wants to change a tire? #8 In my case, I know how, but I call AAA these days as my bones don’t like such things. I am grateful for that option.
#9 Is that it has been nice weather and not too hot. Just a couple of short heat spells followed by sweater weather.

#10 This place is for you. Perhaps you would like walking this path and thinking of the ways you are thankful. Then, you can blog them, too!

the path among the trees
Photo by Kaboompics .com on Pexels.com

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poetry

Violets of the Sea

close up of abstract water against black background
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Violets of the Sea

As the world is changing
vast bodies of water flow and engage
both to the shores and to the depths
lapping below the surface dolphins swim

Would there be a flow of blue chargers
lazing while the far away stingrays glide
diving inward outward to the flow or tidal waves
landing where the souls incline to cry

Red oh red the sea is raging
sending foam of sediment and carcasses
when the sting of operations takes hold
running dare appendages be found

Landing on the banks with safety found
sand within without these crevices
itching and dare not to stand without the call
as the venture into the seas calls me in

Tushes find a place in rushing waters
once again the sea calls out come in
violets come forth from labored creatures
sea gardens of life will rise again

macro photography of bubble coral
Photo by Egor Kamelev on Pexels.com

This poem is in response to my Daily Prompt

non-fiction

Barred Owl Facts

Photo by Stephanie LeBlanc on Unsplash Barred Owls
Photo by Stephanie LeBlanc on Unsplash

Barred Owls have a rich baritone sound, often heard in southern swamps, calling to each other in the pleasant noises of friendship.

Nightly, hunting and calling is most frequent, but these owls may also be around during the day, especially at dawn and dusk when food may be more likely found.

The Great Horned Owl, being a larger owl and a bit more aggressive, their territory may encourage the Barred Owl’s movement away from open wooded areas.
Mice and small creatures, including squirrels, rabbits, opossums, shrews are fair game to owls; And just in case you didn’t know, they also may eat birds, frogs, salamanders, snakes, lizards, some insects and crayfish, crabs, and fish.

Nesting is established with both male and female, a duet of sorts, sometimes in old nests left by other creatures and perhaps alternating nests with some hawks. Mother owls stay in the nest with the eggs and the male takes care of the female and the young start flight at about 6 weeks old.

Source: Audubon.org

There you have it! That is my Six Sentence Story. Want to going? Go to: Girlie on the Edge